Lush Cosmetic Warrior Mask

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Seeing as my spending ban went to pot last Monday when I bought my Inglot Eyeshadow Palette, I threw caution to the wind and my money at the people in Lush. Lush is a shop that I always mean to visit, but I never actually make my way in there, for some reason. I owned some of their products when I was younger; in particular, their Cupcake Mask (which I never really appreciated for what it is). On my beauty wishlist was their Mint Julips Scrub, which I shall review in detail later. So I popped my head in, and was immediately sucked into a newfound Mecca for the skincare enthusiast. It was Nirvana.

What caught my eye initially was a big tub of crushed ice, where the face masks are displayed. I’m a sucker for a good face mask, and I began poring over the different descriptions and ingredients lists, before choosing the Cosmetic Warrior Mask, which is currently sold out online. 75g of product cost €8.95, which I felt was rather reasonable. After all, if I didn’t like it, I wouldn’t feel too bad about chucking it out. And if I loved it, I’d be happy to part with a tenner for it, and still have change. Lush unfortunately don’t provide student discounts, a fact that the cashier and I lamented while I paid. But it’s a small complaint in the grand scheme of things.

Cosmetic Warrior is a mask to be used on blemish-prone, oily skin which is prone to ouchy moments. It claims to soothe, cleanse and balance the skin while also leaving it moisturised. It sounded like an absolute godsend for my skin. Cosmetic Warrior, like all Lush products, contains completely natural ingredients, although it’s not vegan-friendly. I wouldn’t say that this is a huge priority for me, but I like using natural skincare products where I can. 

The active ingredients are:
Fresh garlic for deep cleansing
Fresh green grapes, also for cleansing
Honey for antiseptic and moisturising properties
Tea Tree Oil, which is antibacterial and antiseptic
Cosmetic Warrior also contains kaolin (which my skin likes, very much), organic free range eggs (containing Vitamin A and tightening properties), cornstarch, glycerine (LOVE), limonene and perfume. For those adverse to perfume in their skincare, it is the last ingredient listed, so unlikely to feature too much in the product itself.

The mask is, of course, to be stored in the fridge and it only is good to use for one month, given the absence of preservatives. Some people might find this a faff, but mine is currently residing happily next to a jar of Béarnaise Sauce; I just need to remember to bring it up to the bathroom with me!

Cosmetic Warrior looks like hummus and, for all intents and purposes, feels exactly like hummus being smeared on your face. Not that I’ve any experience with that. I’m merely guessing! However, it smells nothing like hummus. Other bloggers have complained about the garlicky smell of Cosmetic Warrior. I actually smell the Tea Tree Oil more than the garlic, but garlic is one of my many culinary loves, so the smell doesn’t bother me. For what it’s worth, I love the smell of Tea Tree too!

The texture is thick but not as difficult to work with as expected. It spreads evenly over the skin and it’s nice to use a good dollop of it (especially as you only get a month out of it anyway!). You end up with bits of grape peel all over your face, which looks really unnerving when you glance in the mirror. It’s kind of how I imagine leprosy to look like. But at least the little bits don’t drop off; that would be gross. You are instructed to leave the mask on for 5-10 minutes, and it dries to this chalky white consistency that makes you look like you’ve been dabbling with Hallowe’en make-up. Sexy.

I wipe it off with a damp muslin cloth and give a good rinse with warm water. It’s not difficult to get off, and straight away my skin feels soft and smooth. However, I would recommend not to exceed the ten-minute instruction, especially if your skin is combination. Then I spritz on a little La Roche-Posay Thermal Spring Water (as I do with all my masks), followed by my Effaclar Duo and then a calming moisturiser, such as Ren’s Evercalm Global Protection Day Cream.

The results are, for an €8.95 mask, really impressive. The redness around my nose and cheeks is reduced, my open pores look far less conspicuous and my skin is really, really soft. While I’ve yet to try the mask while suffering an active breakout, those pesky starting-to-heal-but-still-red spots are dried out and look a little more defeated. Another happy little result is Cosmetic Warrior’s mattifying effects. After a couple of hours, my face was far less oily than it would usually have been at that point after a normal mask or cleanse. And best of all, my skin isn’t parched either. It is soothed, balanced and moisturised, just as I was hoping.

I thoroughly recommend Cosmetic Warrior to anyone with oily, stressed and spotty skin that needs a bit of TLC. Sure, the smell isn’t anything to write home about, but the results are definitely worth it.

Have any of you tried Lush facemasks before? Have you tried Cosmetic Warrior?

Em X

 

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One thought on “Lush Cosmetic Warrior Mask

  1. Pingback: Lush Mint Julips Scrub | ilyanaroseblog

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